Budget Museum Hacks: 100 uses for foam board – #2 – A chalkboard


100 uses for foam board- #2 – A Chalkboard

Foam board use #1 – Flip books

This use of foam board is simple. A low-cost reusable chalkboard for adding an interactive element to your temporary exhibitions.

The chalkboard

I created this chalkboard for the extremely low budget Lost Collections of the Ancient World exhibit. One of the central objects in the exhibit was a large clay pot full of perforations, the “Mystery Vessel,” so named because we did not know the original intended purpose of this pot. So, we asked exhibit visitors to write what they thought it might be on the chalkboard. This helped add an evolving and interactive component to the exhibit.

“What do you think it is?” Chalkboard

The chalk can be removed just like from a regular board. You can of course paint chalkboard paint directly onto a wall, but the foam board ‘s light weight and portability allow it to be easily hung and re-hung in different locations throughout the museum and exhibits.

Materials: 

  • One foamboard (cut to size)
  • Chalkboard paint (you can purchase this at most hardware stores, or try making your own, it’s cheaper, and you can make it any colour you want!)
  • finishing nails
  • hammer

Step 1: Paint the foam board with an even layer of chalkboard paint

Step 2: Let it dry

Step 3: Use the finishing nails, one at each corner (plus one more along the middle of each edge – if making a large chalkboard) by gently taping in the finishing nails – this takes practice, you don’t want to hit the foam board with your hammer – It will dent!

And you’re done! 

Further suggestion: Do you want to have a full wall chalkboard without the permanency? Try painting multiple foam boards and puzzling them together on the wall.

If you have a Budget Museum Hack of your own, let me know! I would welcome guest blogs in this series 🙂

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About newmuseumkat

I am a museologist and an archaeologist. I love both, but they work best when mixed together.
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